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This volume addresses governance issues related to the need for environmental protection in a national and transboundary context, the need to connect to national environmental, energy and climate-related policies. This is also related to the need for democratic legitimisation of the offshore hydrocarbon activities in the Arctic – a demand that involves a widespread consent in the local communities in the implementation of and compliance with safety rules. As a consequence of this comprehensive approach, and of the diversity of challenges posed by offshore oil and gas activities in the Arctic, the contributions in this volume offer analytical perspectives from various academic disciplines: political science, law, anthropology and biology. Approaches might differ, as legal studies tend to focus on normativity whereas the approaches of political science focus more on the analysis of a process of decision-making. Some contributions engage less than others in the governance and multilevel governance approach and propose a more technical angle. The result of the multidisciplinary approach adopted in this volume is a complementarity of analysis, and some contributions show a high degree of interconnectedness between policy and law.

My chapter – ‘The EU’s Role as Facilitator in the Development of Environmental Law in the Arctic with Focus on Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities’ – explains the ecosystem-based approach in the EU’s marine and maritime directives and highlights how the Offshore Safety Directive has extended the scope of the Environmental Liability Directive, which now also in her opinion includes all the marine areas of EEA/EFTA member states. The main theme of her chapter is how far the EU can rely on the jurisdictions of the Kingdom of Denmark and the Kingdom of Norway in the Arctic as its basis for taking a more active role in the governance of Arctic offshore hydrocarbon activities. Basse describes how the judgments of the European Court of Justice (EUCJ) are driving forces in the vertical harmonisation of international/regional obligations through the EU’s secondary legislation as well as the extraterritorial effects of the EU’s environmental standards and principles. The EU’s membership of OSPAR and other regional and international regimes addressing the protection of the marine area is highlighted as another important issue in the chapter.

Indhold

List of figures

Contributors

List of abbreviations

Acknowledgments

 

1. Introduction

Between Diversity and Coexistence in The Arctic

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX AND ELLEN MARGRETHE BASSE

 

PART I

Globalization and Supra-nationalism in the Arctic

 

2. Framing the Problem in Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Exploitation

TIMO KOIVUROVA

 

3. Sustainable Development in Arctic International Environmental Cooperation and the Governance of Hydrocarbon-Related Activities

CHRISTOPH HUMRICH

 

4. The European Union’s Role As a Facilitator in the Development of Maritime Environmental Law in the Arctic – With Focus on Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities

ELLEN MARGRETHE BASSE

 

5. Indigenous Rights in the Marine Arctic

RACHAEL JOHNSTONE

 

PART II

National Perspectives on Offshore Regulations

 

6. Alaska and Offshore Hydrocarbon Extraction:  A Legal and Socio-Economic Review

EDWARD T. CANUEL

 

7. Governance of Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities in The Arctic and Energy Policies: A Comparative Approach between Norway, Canada and Greenland/Denmark

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX

 

8. The Russian Offshore Oil and Gas Regime: When Tight Control Means Less Order

ROMAN SIDORTSOV

 

9. The Arctic Offshore Hydrocarbon Hiatus of 2015, Climate Change, and Integrated Management: An opportunity to revisit regulation around the Pole

BETSY BAKER

 

PART III

State-Based Approach, Sub-States Entities and Indigenous peoples

 

10. Offshore Development and Inuit Rights in Inuit Nunangat

THIERRY RODON

 

11. Securing the Coastal Sámi Culture and Livelihood

ØYVIND RAVNA AND KRISTOFFER SVENDSEN

 

12. Indigenous Modes of Ownership: Reopening the Case for Communal Rights in Greenland

PELLE TEJSNER

 

PART IV

Regulatory Instruments and Enforcement

 

13. Impact Benefit Agreements and Economic and Environmental Risk Management in the Arctic

VLADIMIR PACHECO CUEVA

 

14. Impact Benefit Agreements in Greenland

BENT OLE MORTENSEN

 

15. The Interplay Between Environmental Research, and Environmental Regulation of Offshore Oil and Gas Activities in Greenland

ANDERS MOSBECH, DAVID BOERTMANN, SUSSE WEGEBERG AND KIM GUSTAVSON

 

 

16. Conclusion

Towards an Integrated and Participatory Governance of the Arctic Marine Areas

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX

 

Index

 

 

Downloads | Links

 

About the Book

This volume addresses governance issues related to the need for environmental protection in a national and transboundary context, the need to connect to national environmental, energy and climate-related policies. This is also related to the need for democratic legitimisation of the offshore hydrocarbon activities in the Arctic – a demand that involves a widespread consent in the local communities in the implementation of and compliance with safety rules. As a consequence of this comprehensive approach, and of the diversity of challenges posed by offshore oil and gas activities in the Arctic, the contributions in this volume offer analytical perspectives from various academic disciplines: political science, law, anthropology and biology. Approaches might differ, as legal studies tend to focus on normativity whereas the approaches of political science focus more on the analysis of a process of decision-making. Some contributions engage less than others in the governance and multilevel governance approach and propose a more technical angle. The result of the multidisciplinary approach adopted in this volume is a complementarity of analysis, and some contributions show a high degree of interconnectedness between policy and law.

My chapter – ‘The EU’s Role as Facilitator in the Development of Environmental Law in the Arctic with Focus on Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities’ – explains the ecosystem-based approach in the EU’s marine and maritime directives and highlights how the Offshore Safety Directive has extended the scope of the Environmental Liability Directive, which now also in her opinion includes all the marine areas of EEA/EFTA member states. The main theme of her chapter is how far the EU can rely on the jurisdictions of the Kingdom of Denmark and the Kingdom of Norway in the Arctic as its basis for taking a more active role in the governance of Arctic offshore hydrocarbon activities. Basse describes how the judgments of the European Court of Justice (EUCJ) are driving forces in the vertical harmonisation of international/regional obligations through the EU’s secondary legislation as well as the extraterritorial effects of the EU’s environmental standards and principles. The EU’s membership of OSPAR and other regional and international regimes addressing the protection of the marine area is highlighted as another important issue in the chapter.

Content

List of figures

Contributors

List of abbreviations

Acknowledgments

 

1. Introduction

Between Diversity and Coexistence in The Arctic

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX AND ELLEN MARGRETHE BASSE

 

PART I

Globalization and Supra-nationalism in the Arctic

 

2. Framing the Problem in Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Exploitation

TIMO KOIVUROVA

 

3. Sustainable Development in Arctic International Environmental Cooperation and the Governance of Hydrocarbon-Related Activities

CHRISTOPH HUMRICH

 

4. The European Union’s Role As a Facilitator in the Development of Maritime Environmental Law in the Arctic – With Focus on Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities

ELLEN MARGRETHE BASSE

 

5. Indigenous Rights in the Marine Arctic

RACHAEL JOHNSTONE

 

PART II

National Perspectives on Offshore Regulations

 

6. Alaska and Offshore Hydrocarbon Extraction:  A Legal and Socio-Economic Review

EDWARD T. CANUEL

 

7. Governance of Offshore Hydrocarbon Activities in The Arctic and Energy Policies: A Comparative Approach between Norway, Canada and Greenland/Denmark

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX

 

8. The Russian Offshore Oil and Gas Regime: When Tight Control Means Less Order

ROMAN SIDORTSOV

 

9. The Arctic Offshore Hydrocarbon Hiatus of 2015, Climate Change, and Integrated Management: An opportunity to revisit regulation around the Pole

BETSY BAKER

 

PART III

State-Based Approach, Sub-States Entities and Indigenous peoples

 

10. Offshore Development and Inuit Rights in Inuit Nunangat

THIERRY RODON

 

11. Securing the Coastal Sámi Culture and Livelihood

ØYVIND RAVNA AND KRISTOFFER SVENDSEN

 

12. Indigenous Modes of Ownership: Reopening the Case for Communal Rights in Greenland

PELLE TEJSNER

 

PART IV

Regulatory Instruments and Enforcement

 

13. Impact Benefit Agreements and Economic and Environmental Risk Management in the Arctic

VLADIMIR PACHECO CUEVA

 

14. Impact Benefit Agreements in Greenland

BENT OLE MORTENSEN

 

15. The Interplay Between Environmental Research, and Environmental Regulation of Offshore Oil and Gas Activities in Greenland

ANDERS MOSBECH, DAVID BOERTMANN, SUSSE WEGEBERG AND KIM GUSTAVSON

 

 

16. Conclusion

Towards an Integrated and Participatory Governance of the Arctic Marine Areas

CÉCILE PELAUDEIX

 

Index

Downloads | Links

 

Governance of Artic Offshore Oil and Gas.
Edited by Cécile Pelaudeix and Ellen Margrethe Basse.

 

300 sider, Hardcover. £105.

eBook £31,49

 

© 2017 Routledge

ISBN: 978-1-472-47150-5